The Coming of the One (The Chronicles of the Kings of Randor Book 1)


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King Arthur: Warrior of the West. This second novel in a trilogy begins twelve years after Artor's coronation.

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The first third of this third-person novel describes Artor's twelfth and final large battle against the Saxons, this one in the north against Glamdring Ironfist. The rest of the novel describes Artor's marriage to Wenhaver--a terribly spoiled, selfish girl--and its terrible consequences. Crompton, Anne Eliot. Percival's Angel.

New York: Roc, They are never two dimensional either and I often found myself sympathising with characters who may have started out as nominally 'bad'. Martin uses the level of empathy he generates with the characters against yo This is a series worthy of its hype. Martin uses the level of empathy he generates with the characters against you, and happily murders his way through his cast, even central or well liked characters, generating genuine emotions in his reader.

Usually rage. The world is nominally magical, but it is low fantasy, focussing more on earthy political machinations and magic never really intrudes into the story or breaks the immersion with wand waving. The world is brutal, as you would expect from a medieval type setting, with gore aplenty, although not simply for the sake of it. He is also something of a dirty old man, and his title of George 'Rape Rape' Martin is almost earned.

Despite this his female characters are extremely well written and major players in the story. Here's hoping he doesn't get too distracted by the tv series and manages to get around to finishing the last two doorstopper size books before his advancing years and lifestyle cause an author total existence failure through an inevitable heart attack. Finally, the only aspect of his otherwise brilliantly believable world that my scientist's mind couldn't suspend disbelief for is the messed up seasons of Westeros.

Seasons are of arbitrary length and timing? Multiple years long? I can't begin to think of the orbital geometry required for that A great work of fantasy, with its ups and downs in terms of attention grabbing. Had a few problems with Martin's style of writing at first, like he was playing at being a fantasy writer, mimicking a fantasy narrative style, instead of just writing. It did get better after the second book. As for the story itself, it has no shortage of shocking moments, and I love how Martin does not try to sway the readers into preferring some characters over others, or establishing a "good" side and an "evil" A great work of fantasy, with its ups and downs in terms of attention grabbing.

As for the story itself, it has no shortage of shocking moments, and I love how Martin does not try to sway the readers into preferring some characters over others, or establishing a "good" side and an "evil" side. In this way, this might be one of the most realistic portrayals of a fantasy medieval setting in all of literature. Oct 25, Melanie rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites. If you find that you can't stick to it when you first starting read the book The first pages are a bit intense because there are SO many characters and so much going on but oh, once you get the hang of who's who and what's what it will just blow.

It's one of those books that takes things slow and just keeps building up till it just explodes into all kinds of good stuff in the end but even when it's going slow there are some OH MY GOD! It's one of those books that takes things slow and just keeps building up till it just explodes into all kinds of good stuff in the end but even when it's going slow there are some incredible twists!

I can't WAIT to get to the other books. I didn't watch the TV series because I knew I'd read the book someday I bought the books last year! Oh goodness this was quite the long haul but I made it! Very excellent, dived right into ADwD. Some foreshadowing, which is always fun. Jan 21, Vicki rated it it was amazing. Martin is not shy about creating a fantasy world of great complexity, peopling it with many characters, some of whom are noble, some clever, some conniving, and some downright evil. He probably felt empowered by the fact that he shares the rare phenomena of two middle names, both beginning with "R," with the other epic fantasy world creator of our time, J.

The times are apparently in the post-dragon era, but their existence is not so long ago that they are considered myth George R. The times are apparently in the post-dragon era, but their existence is not so long ago that they are considered mythological. Beyond the great Wall to the North, built generations ago, there are wild and mysterious people and animals about whom fantastic stories are told to children at bedtime, but those beings may or may not be mythological.

The seasons are harsh, measured in years, and though snow and cold is frequently the norm, it is considered the season of summer as the story begins. Life is incredibly hard and is cut short all too often by violence. The author is telling the story of several families in the Seven Kingdoms. Until relatively few years ago the kingdoms had developed independently and had warred among themselves.

Now however the kingdoms are functioning as one under one head of State, King Robert. Robert, a fearless warrior in his youth, loved the process of becoming king, but now, some 20 years later, is not enjoying the duties that go along with the title. His wife Cersei and her family, the Lannisters, seem to be eroding Robert's effectiveness while quietly becoming more and more powerful themselves.

Robert's best friend, Eddard Stark is lord of his own realm, Winterfell, which is the kingdom of the North. Eddard had been a courageous warrior alongside Robert, but has become a wise and trusted leader of his people and a good family man as well. Neither he nor his wife Catelyn are happy when the king summons him to become his second in command at King's Landing. The position is called the King's Hand and involves doing any task the king is not interested in doing. King's Landing is many days' journey to the south of Winterfell.

Eddard makes the tactical decision to go, leaving Catelyn and their sons to protect and maintain their land, but taking their daughters and a small contingent of trusted followers. The sacrifice seems necessary to protect the peace of the Kingdom, not to mention delving into the mysterious death of the king's previous Hand.

The saga unfolds in the words of various members of Stark's family as well as the brother of the queen, the dwarf Tyrion Lannister. He is a man blessed with sharp wit and a good mind to offset his malformed body. In addition to his three sons and two daughters by his wife Catelyn, Eddard is also raising his bastard son Jon Snow and a ward from one of the families of the South, Theon Greyjoy. The perspective of the surviving children of the king who was deposed by Robert also becomes an integral part of the story. The family Targaryen had been the last keepers of the dragons and were the last rulers of the Old Dynasty.

Much of the intrigue is revealed to the reader through the naive point of view of the children, who are blind to the wiles of many of the cunning adults they observe. It is a pleasure to watch them learn and grow wiser, in most cases, as they deal with the circumstances that have been thrust upon them.

Several volumes remain before this magnificent saga is complete, and I have already downloaded A Clash of Kings. I'm sure I'll have mixed feelings when I have read the last one. This world just swallows up your imagination, and just like The Lord of the Rings, it will be hard to leave behind.

May 29, Chrystal Grcevich rated it really liked it. Martin, wow It's brilliant. I don't even know where to begin. Basically, these books start off telling you which way the wind blows, how everyone looks, how everyone is related to everyone else, yadda yadda.

Truthfully, I have to say that I put down the book in my case, I bought the four-book e-book pack, so Everything from landscapes to personalities were brilliantly described and made the world come to life. Unfortunately, every character I truly fell in love with got killed, or died or maimed. Thankfully, some of the rotten ones did, too.

The Coming of the One: Book One of the Chronicles of the Kings of Randor by Donald Drake

Before getting to the rotten, terrible people getting killed, though, all of the innocent, lovable characters disappeared one by one. This truly is a game of thrones. Not one character is inherently good, and most are not inherently bad, save for Joffrey. I wanted to just throttle him. I wish he'd been brought back to life and killed 1, times! I don't think I've ever had such hatred for a fictional character. There is enough "mysticality" presented in the novels to keep your interest, but it is not overly done. There's a spell here, a glimpse of mystery there and different races mentioned throughout.

The feudal concept is certainly not a new one, but Mr. Martin has created the feudal environment without going over-the-top medieval or emphasizing quests for a "magical this or that. I believe that there were plenty of details that could have been left out, but when the book was finished, I was actually glad that there had been so much detail to take in.

There were a lot of item details that seemed to have no purpose until you got to parts later in the book. I honestly wish I'd had the physical copies for this reason because it is so much easier to flip through paper than to scroll endlessly through 4, pages! In fact, the ebook format that I bought was so terrible that it didn't even have a way to scan the books individually or to pick a page.

Every slight movement of my finger on the scroll bar took me forward or backward nearly pages. If you find yourself picking up these books and wanting to stop after pages, just keep going through. It's so worth it!

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Since the series is not complete, though, the ending fourth physical book leaves you hanging. Thankfully, the fifth book is out now, though not as excellently wrought as these four.


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Sep 20, Ilika Ranjan rated it liked it. Martin: A tremendous epic of all times in which the transformation of each character is absolutely hard hitting, real and compelling. The reader is forced to transcend to that era feeling the pain and ruthlessness of circumstances, and witnessing the hardening of personalities in the book. Every page pushes the reader to explore what next? This very aspect is warning me to be wary of the information I render in the book review, without revealing any of the hidden mysteries. The descriptions in the book are so vivid that one can genuinely experience the milieu and relate to the difficulties experienced by the characters by virtue of the weather and the hostility of the terrain.

The Song of Ice and Fire is written in a series of which six books that have been released and the author is yet to introduce the end. Book one: A Game of Thrones. Book two: A Clash of Kings. Book three: A Storm of Swords. Part one: Steel and Snow. Part two: Blood and Gold. The book is inundated with characters each reflecting shades of both grey and white. A Valiant and fair prince also a responsible brother and a dutiful son. Sansa Stark: a vulnerable damsel living in the world of fairies who gradually comes in terms to agonizing truth of life.

Arya Stark: Gutsy and valiant, a mature and strong lass. Jon Snow: A roughened and strong boy with great depth, despite being a bastard. Bran: A kid victimized by conspiracy. Rickon: youngest son of Lord Stark King Robert Baratheon: A complete failure as a king, as a husband, as a friend and a compulsive womanizer. Cersei: Wife of King Robert, a scheming woman, malicious and vindictive. Cunning and revengeful, yet the man demonstrated shades of kindness and justice as the story advances. Tyrion: a gentleman despite being disparaged and demeaned.

Protectors of Stark family. Complete Review available at : www. Feb 22, W. Driscoll rated it really liked it. Martin's gritty fantasy series, A Song of Ice and Fire, is set in a quasi-medieval world where magic is returning and winter is coming; breaking onto the scene with the publication of the first volume in , A Game of Thrones, it has now reached its fifth installment with 's A Dance with Dragons.

The narrative takes place on the mythical continents of Westros and Essos; told from 31 different points of view to date , it follows the bloody machinations of four major houses: Hou George R. The narrative takes place on the mythical continents of Westros and Essos; told from 31 different points of view to date , it follows the bloody machinations of four major houses: House Stark, House Lannister, House Baratheon and House Targaryen. In War of the Roses fashion replete with knights, lords and ladies, feasts and tourneys, using first intrigue and assassination then all out war, these vie and plot against each other to attain the ultimate prize, the Iron Throne and the rule of all Westros.

Made even more popular by a recent HBO miniseries in which Peter Dinklage stole the show from a good cast as Tyrion Lannister , there is much to like and admire here. Having read up to the fourth book, A Feast of Crows, and having found it a disappointing outlier, I will confine my thoughts to the first three volumes: A Games of Thrones, A Clash of Kings and A Storm of Swords, as imaginative a trilogy as a fantasy reader could wish to find or hope to enjoy.

Time magazine, in its infinite literary wisdom, called Martin "the American Tolkien" which is at best gross hyperbole, at worst an insult to all other American fantasy writers as well as a disservice to the author here; for it's not in world creation and mythology that Martin's genius lies his back-story being a shallow puddle in comparison to Tolkein's bottomless Mirrormere but in complex characterizations and set pieces that draw the reader into what would otherwise be a generally unpleasant and amoral universe.

Climaxing in the "red wedding" one of the most brilliant, stunning and narratively costly endings I've read, the first three books of the series are ingenious and engaging. Not for younger or more sensitive readers, Martin's novels are filled with gritty realism, sex, violence and general unpleasantness. Still, I would heartily recommend them not just for fantasy readers, but for all readers who wish to be masterfully transported to another time and place. Apr 13, Manuel Pirino rated it really liked it Shelves: adventure. The boxed set of the Song of Ice and Fire.

These books have been an amazing journey. The plot is great, and the world of Westeros and everything around it compelling and easy to plunge into. I give it an overall 4 stars. The saga is great, no question about it, but Martin could have made it in fewer pages. I guess it was intentional, the world evolved with its popularity, and even more so after the HBO series. So he took pains to describe it in minute detail, to feed the need for escapism of s The boxed set of the Song of Ice and Fire.

So he took pains to describe it in minute detail, to feed the need for escapism of so many of us. In Dickensian style, he decides to "make 'em laugh, make 'em cry, make 'em wait! Dickens wrote in instalments, on magazines, and his ponderous volumes were not much slimmer than Martin's, and if he did it, Martin sure as hell can do it too. A few things I did not like? Maybe the pot pourri of Eurasian cultures and settings.

We have medieval Venice, with bankers and gondole. We have medieval London, with the Lancaster, ahem, Lannister. We have the decadent and exotic East, where everyone dresses in robes, eats bugs and dogs, and is a merchant, an assassin and an opium smoker, etc etc We have endless and needless descriptions of menus, and not of a single meal we are spared the description, in fine detail.

Be it a banquet for a royal wedding, or a stop-over at a wayside wine sink. Every gathering features a list of banners, sigils, coats of arm. And yet, for all of these flaws I deem them minor, but reading the 5 books back to back tends to make you notice them Memorable characters, plot twists, cliffhangers, sudden and shocking deaths of major plot drivers, humour, epic fights, but most importantly the story lets us get to know better some of the heroes and some of the villains, giving us different points of view on their actions, making it easier to relate and sympathize, to love and sometimes even to hate them.

Yes, it is nerdy. Yes, it's too long and convoluted. Oct 05, Ellen rated it liked it Shelves: glad-read-never-wantread-again , war. The third book is the best; the first and fourth the weakest; quality ranges from 5-stars to 2-stars but its a fascinating tale nonetheless. Martin is a master of cause and effect as well as character development. As is true in life, all of the events in this book make sense in hindsight - they can all be traced to choices characters made that reacted with the choices of other characters.

Those who say that only good characters die aren't paying attention. What's revolutionary about this series is that there are many protagonists but they are at odds with each other and they all evolve to reveal varying degrees of inner good and evil, strength and weakness. Good characters have fatal flaws and evil characters reveal moments of goodness, the dominoe effect of which changes the fate of all the other characters. As in life, anyone good or bad can die and does die. Even if shocking in the moment of the death of a main character, in hindsight you can see that the doom is easily traceable to their choices moral or not and even foreshadowed.

This book is the world's longest chess game, where surprise moves come out of nowhere and redefine the game. Martin left TV to write a story so large and complex that it could never be made into a movie or TV show. Ironically his story plays out better in a visual medium but I enjoyed absorbing all of the extra details in the book in the same way that one might enjoy reading thousands of pages about the thoughts of the characters in Mad Men. The Achilles' heel of the HBO series and book series is its portrayal of sexuality which tarnishes it. There's not a lot of sexuality in the book and that's a good thing because the author's sexual experiences seem to be limited to young adult fiction and online porn.

He seems to have never had a meaningful, transcendant sexual experience with a woman and that's sad because otherwise these characters are so believable that they begin to take over your consciousness in book form anyway. HBO thankfully comes equipped with a fast-forward button. Readers also enjoyed. About George R. Martin was born September 20, , in Bayonne, New Jersey. He began writing very young, selling monster stories to other neighborhood children for pennies, George R. He began writing very young, selling monster stories to other neighborhood children for pennies, dramatic readings included.

Later he became a comic book fan and collector in high school, and began to write fiction for comic fanzines amateur fan magazines. Martin's first professional sale was made in at age "The Hero," sold to Galaxy, published in February, issue. Other sales followed. In Martin received a B. He went on to complete a M. He also directed chess tournaments for the Continental Chess Association from , and was a Journalism instructor at Clarke College, Dubuque, Iowa, from In he married Gale Burnick.

They divorced in , with no children. Martin became a full-time writer in He was writer-in-residence at Clarke College from He was Executive Producer for Doorways, a pilot which he wrote for Columbia Pictures Television, which was filmed during Martin's present home is Santa Fe, New Mexico. Other books in the series. A Song of Ice and Fire 7 books. Books by George R. Trivia About A Song of Ice and Quotes from A Song of Ice and Welcome back.

Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Read A Song Of Ic Sumner A Period: Blog 9. Sumner A Period: Blog 8. Sumner A Period: Blog 7. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier Geek Love by Katherine Dunn Heart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill An over-the-hill rock star buys a haunted suit on the Internet. World War Z by Max Brooks Zombie fiction has never come close to the cultural impact and artistic importance of zombie cinema, until World War Z came along.

He shows us how the infection could realistically spread around the globe thanks to human trafficking. He shows us how modern militaries could possibly be defeated via poor planning and mass defections. He shows us how society might be after 90 percent of humanity has been killed and an uneasy rebuilding period has begun. The Other by Thomas Tryon Little Star by John Ajvide Lindqvist With shades of Carrie , Little Star does little to dissuade that similarity.

Two young girls, one extraordinary and one suffocating under her own feelings of mediocrity, connect online and form a friendship that will have terrible consequences. Lindqvist taps into the modern-day fears that drive adolescent anxiety—less locker room, more Internet comment section—and stretches them out to their most disturbing logical conclusion. The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes While horror has always flourished on the small-press scene, Lauren Beaukes is helping to forge a continued legacy for the genre at major publishers as well.

As in her exceptional follow-up, Broken Monsters , South African novelist Beukes weaves together a diverse cast of characters and just enough science fiction to complicate her premise without distracting from the horror at hand. Girl Next Door by Jack Ketchum The novel, which is based on the Indiana murder case of Sylvia Likens, follows single mother, alcoholic and next-door neighbor Ruth, who takes in two nieces after their parents die in a car accident.

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The Coming of the One (The Chronicles of the Kings of Randor Book 1)
The Coming of the One (The Chronicles of the Kings of Randor Book 1)
The Coming of the One (The Chronicles of the Kings of Randor Book 1)
The Coming of the One (The Chronicles of the Kings of Randor Book 1)
The Coming of the One (The Chronicles of the Kings of Randor Book 1)
The Coming of the One (The Chronicles of the Kings of Randor Book 1)
The Coming of the One (The Chronicles of the Kings of Randor Book 1)
The Coming of the One (The Chronicles of the Kings of Randor Book 1)

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